INK Consulting Blog

INK Consulting’s mission is to help nonprofit organizations realize the potential of all relationships. INK combines hands-on experience, strategic thinking and a healthy view of the big picture to help nonprofits create an organizational culture of concentrating on what really drives mission success: relationships.


Leave a comment

What’s Your Word?

If you have been reading my blog regularly, I think that you get my point that I think all relationships are important toward the achievement of any nonprofit’s mission. So many different groups of people have a lot to offer to your nonprofit.

Do you believe this too? If so, do you act on what you believe?

If your organization truly values all relationships, you’ve likely moved beyond the donor-centric language. Instead, you might be using more accurate words: supporters, customers or constituents — instead of a catchall term like “donors.”

So tell me, what word does your nonprofit organization use to talk about your collective relationships? Do you use supporters, constituents, customers or something else? For whatever word you use, what does this definition include for you (volunteers, government officials, general community members)? Please share your thoughts in the comments box of this post.

…And if you aren’t at the stage of changing your internal language yet, I hope that this post made you stop and think about what you might need to change for your organization…

Advertisements


Leave a comment

It All Starts with a Belief…

No, this is not a love story. Not a religious story. Not a story about self-confidence. It is not even a story at all.

I’ve stated it in my pasts posts — I’m passionate about relationships. It is my opinion that relationships are what will bring nonprofits success. I believe in the power of relationships. I truly believe that relationships mean everything for nonprofits.

Most nonprofits, with good reason, focus heavily on donors as a key segment of people. This focus stems from the belief that money will solve the problems that the organizational mission seeks to achieve. Plain, simple, and not entirely untrue.

Continue reading